New Zealand – Problems with Thranda Quest Kodiak

I’ve undergone some frustrations with the Kodiak here in New Zealand. There seems to be a certain sector of airspace that causes X-Plane 11 (now 11.10rc3) to invariably crash. I can fly from the north to Raglan and Hamilton and from there, south to New Plymouth, but trying to fly east always causes a software crash.

To get around this problem, I flew the Cessna Skyhawk from Raglan to Hamilton (…because there was one there to rent with GPS), from Hamilton to New Plymouth, and finally from New Plymouth to Gisborne. As you can see from my log below, I also flew the Cessna Caravan from Hamilton to Matamata, from Matamata to Tauranga and from Tauranga to Great Barrier Island.

FireShot Pro Screen Capture #049 - 'FSEconomy terminal' - server_fseconomy_net_log_jsp

I was also able to fly from New Plymouth to Ohakea Military Airport on the coast south of New Plymouth. I am currently enroute to Nelson, on the South Island. From there, I will try to work my way back north on the east side of the north island.

Crossing the Tasman sea to New Zealand

Yesterday I flew from Gunnedah Airport in Australia to Norfolk Island. This was a distance of 927 miles, my furthest flight so far in the Kodiak. I took off from Norfolk Island about 15 minutes ago headed for the northern tip of the north island of New Zealand to Kaitaia airport, a distance of 452 miles. Although the calculated fuel burn is only about 120 gallons, I topped out the tanks with 320 gallons. You never know when you might get lost! I’m also flying at FL200, 20,000 feet! My MFD indicates that I have two hours to my destination–in other words, my ETE. I’m leveled off at FL200 now. The prop is pulled back from 2200 to 2000 RPM. The power is set for 1172 Ft-Lb torque, giving a fuel burn of about 247 pounds per hour (PPH). The temperature is -25° C, the IAS is 148kt and the TAS is 201kt. I currently have about an 8kt tail wind and my GS is 205kt.

14:28 zulu: I just arrived at Kaitaia. Here are some statistics for my flight from Norfolk Island, YSNF, to Kaitaia, NZKT:

  • Distance – 453 nm
  • Fuel consumption – 118 gallons
  • Fuel consumption PPH (Pounds per hour) – 41
  • Time enroute – 2:53 (includes startup, preparation (flight plan) and taxi

Now I plan to make a short hop to NZKK, Kerikeri/Bay of Islands Airport. My current assignments for the flight from Norfolk Island are to drop 3 passengers in Hamilton, NZHN (Cliff Tate’s home airport) and 4 passengers in Tauranga, NZHT. I would like to land at several small airports on the flight down to Tauranga although, being the middle of the night, it doesn’t make much sense! Perhaps I can take on another couple of passengers along the way. I still have 200 gallons of fuel on board so I shouldn’t have to refuel. Keri Keri is only 33 nm.

Sure enough, I found 2 more passengers going to Hamilton from Kaitaia so I am now completely loaded. I had to put the cargo pod back on in order to put the CG in a reasonable location, about 74 inches aft of datum.

Here is what the aircraft loading looks like without the cargo pod:

X-Plane Screenshot 2017.12.05 - 09.50.41.50
Aircraft loading profile without the cargo pod – no cargo and 9 passengers

 

Here is what it looks like with the cargo pod:

Desktop Screenshot 2017.12.05 - 09.53.35.16
CG with cargo pod and 9 passengers

But here is a better solution. I’ve removed the cargo pod again but removed the 115 lb from the baggage compartment and changed the passenger weights. It has moved the CG back a bit but still reasonable. The aircraft performance will be much better without the cargo pod!

Here is a short video clip of my flight from Kaitaia to Kerikeri:

What is an aircraft’s payload?

Here is a good article from AOPA explaining payload for an airplane. I’m trying to determine the maximum cargo load I can fly in the Kodiak. It turns out that payload doesn’t include fuel. The payload includes the weight that the customer pays for when hiring and aircraft.

Here are two key items from the article:

  • Not all the fuel can be subtracted. Unusable fuel can’t be burned so it remains as part of the aircraft’s weight. Total up the gallons of fuel that can be burned, multiply by the weight per gallon (six pounds per gallon for avgas or 6.8 pounds for Jet A), and subtract that from the aircraft’s useful load. Uh, oh. What’s useful load?
  • The FAA definition is this: Payload is the weight of occupants, cargo, and baggage.
  • MAXIMUM CERTIFICATED WEIGHTS FOR QUEST KODIAK
    Ramp……………………………………………………………………6800 lb
    Takeoff …………………………………………………………………6750 lb
    Landing………………………………………………………………..6690 lb

In the case of the Kodiak, the useful load is:

  • TYPICAL AIRPLANE WEIGHTS
    Standard Empty Weight ………………………………………..3530 lb
    Maximum Standard Useful Load……………………………3270 lb

FireShot Pro Screen Capture
View Screen Capture
 

New address for this blog

This blog is now at http://tortui.com. I also upgraded from my Basic to a Premium WordPress account today. The cost was only $12 more per year! I’m still unable to install the Sydney theme though.

To change from https://tortui.wordpress.com to http://tortui.com I only had to edit DNS information on my Enom Domain Settings page by checking the Custom radio button instead of the Default button. That wiped out all of my Host Records and Email Settings. I added the three WordPress domain servers in the lines provided:

NS1.WORDPRESS.COM

NS2.WORDPRESS.COM

NS3.WORDPRESS.COM

I then went to plans/my domains/Edit Domain/Edit DNS and found that my MX records were already added.

Before changes made to make tortui.com the domain name for my WordPress blog at WordPress.com:

After changes were made. Now the domain is pointing at WordPress’s name servers:

STOL Aircraft to consider for FSEconomy back country flights

Pilatus PC-6

https://www.pilatus-aircraft.com/en/fly/pc-6

https://www.pilatus-aircraft.com/data/document/5937e7c15f90a_Pilatus-Aircraft-Ltd-PC-6-Factsheet.pdf

Pilatus PC-12 NG

https://www.pilatus-aircraft.com/en/fly/pc-12

http://www.carenado.com/CarSite/Portal/index.php

Cessna Grand Caravan 208B

https://www.globalair.com/aircraft-for-sale/Specifications?specid=1273